Girls in STEM

Update: Spotlight School Success

Update: Spotlight School Success

SUCCESS! Since electing Liberty Elementary School as our Spotlight School, we have come to adore the Liberty family more and more each day.  T

News and Insight

Search articles, videos and updates on 3D Printing and its growing presence in our world

Girls in STEM

WATCH: Ms. Houck's TEACHER FEATURE

WATCH: Ms. Houck's TEACHER FEATURE

This week, we bring you a short video on a STEM'tastic educator! Scroll down to WATCH this educator doing what she does best - teachi

Videos

Cool Vid: 3D Printing for K-12 Education

Cool Vid: 3D Printing for K-12 Education

Watching super cool EDUCATIONAL videos from across the web is one of our favorite pastimes! Join us in learning more about 3D printing in the clas

Science and Math

'Tis the Season for STEM

'Tis the Season for STEM

'Tis the season for GINGERBREAD and working the delicious treat into your family - and CLASSROOM - fun. Last week, as students across the

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Why is SpaceX using aerospace 3D Printing?

By Staff Writter

Why is SpaceX using aerospace 3D Printing?

Engineering

In most aerospace 3d printing operations, the procedure is to develop a part to be printed on a CAD terminal before downloading the design to the printer for fabrication. However SpaceX’s Elon Musk recently demonstrated how a new type of hand gesture computer aided design system could be hooked up to a 3d printer for rapid prototyping of rocket parts,

The way it works is that a 3d model of a part or even a fully developed rocket engine can be grabbed, manipulated, and maneuvered on a computer screen using hand gestures. The technology has been compared to what Tony Stark used in the “Iron Man” films. The rocket part can also be manipulated on a bigger computer screen with the designer wearing virtual reality glasses to perceive it in 3d.

Once the designer is satisfied with the design of the part, the CAD file is download to a laser 3d printer. The part is then created using an additive manufacturing process laying in layers of titanium.

The idea behind this technology is that working on a part in a standard CAD terminal is “unnatural” and that designers are better able to quickly develop things like rocket parts as if they are assembling it by hand. Only in this case the thing being “assembled” is an image. The image becomes real when it is sent to the 3d printer. Then the part can be tested. If changes need to be made, the designer returns to the VR version of it to manipulate it again before printing out a new version. Thus science fiction is becoming reality.