Girls in STEM

Update: Spotlight School Success

Update: Spotlight School Success

SUCCESS! Since electing Liberty Elementary School as our Spotlight School, we have come to adore the Liberty family more and more each day.  T

News and Insight

Search articles, videos and updates on 3D Printing and its growing presence in our world

Girls in STEM

WATCH: Ms. Houck's TEACHER FEATURE

WATCH: Ms. Houck's TEACHER FEATURE

This week, we bring you a short video on a STEM'tastic educator! Scroll down to WATCH this educator doing what she does best - teachi

Videos

Cool Vid: 3D Printing for K-12 Education

Cool Vid: 3D Printing for K-12 Education

Watching super cool EDUCATIONAL videos from across the web is one of our favorite pastimes! Join us in learning more about 3D printing in the clas

Science and Math

'Tis the Season for STEM

'Tis the Season for STEM

'Tis the season for GINGERBREAD and working the delicious treat into your family - and CLASSROOM - fun. Last week, as students across the

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3D Printing Education at Medical Schools

By Staff Writter

3D Printing Education at Medical Schools

3D Classroom

One of the ways that medical school students learn is through operating on human cadavers. However the combination of more people going into the medical profession and more people living longer have resulted in a shortage of dead bodies for med students to operate on.According to MedCity News, which is produced by the Mayo Clinic, Monash University in Australia seems to have come up with a solution. They propose 3D printing human body parts.

The way it works is hat an actual human being is scanned and then his or her body parts are 3D printed layer by layer in appropriate colors. Thus simulated body parts will be available without the expense of cold storage for medical students to learn from.

The one drawback is that cadavers are still needed for students to dissect and practice surgical techniques on. But even this will one day be addressed by the emerging technology of 3D printing.

Researchers are already delving into the idea of printing body parts made of human tissue that can be used for transplanting. There is no reason to believe that an entire body – lifeless of course – could not one day be printed for medical students to practice their skills with the knife on.

In this kind of arrangement, cadavers can be custom built to simulate certain conditions that a surgeon will have to deal with, say an enlarged heart, a cancer tumor, or a spinal injury. Thus the science of medical education will be changed for the better.